Housing experiences of older LGBTQs

This article come from The Guardian. It’s an article from 2012, but the issues, unfortunately, are still prevalent today.

Is the housing sector prepared to meet the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people as they get older?
Men carrying rainbow flags take part in annual Gay Pride Parade

Three in five LGBT survey respondents said they were not confident that housing services would understand or be sensitive to their needs Photograph: Francesco Spotorno / Reuters/REUTERS

By John Thornhill and Tina Wathern on 3 May, 2012

A generation of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) men and women who came out of the closet following the decriminalisation of male homosexual acts in 1967 and the New York Stonewall riots of 1969 are now entering retirement. Continue reading

Cultural awareness improves dementia care for South Asian minorities

This article comes to us from the UK-based news source, The Guardian. You can access the original article by clicking on the title, below.

Cultural awareness improves dementia care for South Asian minorities

Reduced awareness and stigma around mental health can prevent people from the south Asian community accessing dementia care. Continue reading

Social enterprises improving dementia care

This article originally was posted on theguardian.com. It’s about how socially-driven companies (social enterprises – a great new trend in business) are making an impact improving dementia care. Social enterprises can be charities, for profit companies, and anything in-between – but they all have a common goal of changing and improving the way something is in society.

Dementia care: how social enterprises are developing products and services

Dementia in the arts

This post came to me via a facebook group for students studying dementias. The original article is from gulfnews.com. I have edited the content of this article to better suit this blog (the original article dramatized loss and uses words to describe people and dementia that I would rather not repeat).

Dementia and the arts

With nearly one million Britons in the grip of dementia, it’s hardly surprising that writers and artists should increasingly tackle the subject. But can the arts ever illuminate a condition that by its very nature resists all understanding? Continue reading

Dementiaville

I have seen a bit of buzz on the dementia-related internet lately about “Dementiaville.” Wondering what it was, aside from a blog by the same name (you can read that blog here), I found it is a UK-based program on new approaches to dementia care.

Click on the link below to go to the site and watch the episodes, or find out how to learn more about dementia (for FREE) by clicking the link at the bottom of this post.

Happy learning!

Dementiaville

Imagine travelling back in time with your loved one to discover the person they once were. This series explores a radical approach to Dementia care.

Learn more with The Open University

Visit the OU’s free learning website to access a collection of articles, listen to a short audio story about living with dementia (Louise’s Story) and have your say on a range of issues and different perspectives that arise.

11 facts about dementia

These 11 facts that raise awareness about dementia come from buzzfeed.com.

The main thing is that life doesn’t end when dementia begins.

1. In the UK, around 225,000 people will develop dementia each year – that’s the equivalent to one person every three minutes.

In the UK, around 225,000 people will develop dementia each year – that's the equivalent to one person every three minutes.

thinkstockphotos.co.uk / Via thinkstockphotos.co.uk

There are 850,000 people in the UK living with dementia, which means you might know someone affected by the condition. Dementia is not just about memory loss – there are many different kinds of dementia, and symptoms vary widely.

Continue reading

5 great hotels for traveling with dementia

This is a re-post from AlzLive. It highlights 5 places to stay in the UK if you are planning to travel with someone with dementia.

TOP HOTELS

by YUKI HAYASHI

Five great vacation homes-away-from-home for you and your relative with dementia.

When it comes to offering the services required for safe vacationing with a dementia patient, the U.K. is years ahead of most countries. It’s critically important that caregivers, who are often on call 24 hours a day, get a break for their own health and sanity. For that reason–not to mention the breathtaking scenery, historic tours and R+R potential–consider going across the pond for your next vacation. Here are five U.K. destinations we love. 

Continue reading

Shopping we all can enjoy, the rise of aging-friendly stores

I came across the following article this morning. It’s about a grocery store in Eau Claire, Wisconsin that has become dementia-friendly, in partnership with their local Aging and Disability Resource Center and the global Purple Angel Campaign.

Inspired, I did a bit more digging around on the internet, and wrote this post about how communities and businesses are becoming more age-friendly and dementia-friendly. Examples from New York, Wisconsin, the UK, Germany, and Japan are highlighted.

Continue reading

Dementia-friendly travel with EasyJet

The article below is about EasyJet, a low-cost airline based out of the UK, is joining Dementia Friends! The UK is really doing great things to make businesses and communities dementia-friendly. Awesome!!

This article is a repost from AlzLive, a great website to check out, by the way. Happy reading and happy travels!

FLY THE DEMENTIA-FRIENDLY SKIES OF EASYJET

By Susan Grimbly, Managing Editor

easyJet, the short-haul budget British airline carrier with the long orange type, is the first airline to step in line with the dementia challenge issued by British Prime Minister David Cameron in 2012.

Flying with dementia is a growing challenge in the aviation industry. As Roberto Castiglioni, at ReducedMobility.eu, reports:

The travel experience of a passenger with Alzheimer’s can plunge into chaos at its early stages, as soon as the person reaches the airport terminal.

The travel experience of a passenger with Alzheimer’s can plunge into chaos at its early stages, as soon as the person reaches the airport terminal building.

A new, largely unknown location or a crowded departure hall can be sufficient to cause disorientation.

Reduced Mobility Rights has come across reports of passengers with dementia wandering off airport premises.

“The in-flight experience, and external factors such as cabin pressurization, a crowded flight, and seating restrictions (safety belts) may also cause unexpected behavior.”

To read the rest of the story “Is Dementia The Next Challenge For The Air Travel Industry?” go to ReducedMobility.eu here. Those are sobering thoughts.

Easyjet interior

Alzlive.com spoke to an easyJet spokesperson about the company’s forward-thinking strategy.

Why easyJet?

The initiative, called Dementia Friends, was launched by the Alzheimer’s Society and the Cabinet Office, and includes names such as Marks & Spencer, EDF, FirstGroup and Lloyds Bank.

Who is the executive within your company pushing for this?

easyJet CEO Carolyn McCall proposed this change as an integral part of our strategy and on the advice of easyJet’s Special Assistance Advisory Group, which is chaired by the Right Hon. David Blunkett MP, and includes Age UK among its members. The group has been discussing the issue for some time.

How big is the company and would the dementia-friendly staff be on all flights?

easyJet is the U.K.’s largest airline and the fourth largest in Europe. easyJet plans to roll this out to all of its staff.

How many staff would you hire to start with?

This will be part of the comprehensive special assistance training we already provide to all staff and will help raise awareness of the issue.

Have issues with handling those with dementia come up on flights in the past?

We cannot comment on any specific cases, but dementia sufferers are known to sometimes wander off. The U.S. Alzheimer’s Association explains that 60 percent of persons with Alzheimer’s will wander at some stage, which is why pre-notification is so important. A dementia sufferer on board can also pose a challenge for any crew unaware of the condition.

This can be a difficult and unpleasant experience for both the sufferer and the crew. We also need to consider the safety implications for of all our passengers on board as this is our number one priority.

How many people with dementia, would you guess, are now flying/travelling?

This is difficult to assess as pre-notification remains low in this area. easyJet flies around 300,000 passengers requiring special assistance every year.

Do you think this passenger group will grow?

There is no doubt that with Europe’s population living longer, out of 61 million passengers annually, the number of possible sufferers flying with easyJet is likely to increase. A Eurostat survey has shown that in 2040, 25.5 percent of the population will be over 65 years old and 8.4 percent over 80, whereas today the numbers are 16 percent and 4 percent respectively.

We want to make travel easy and affordable for all of our passengers which is why we have joined the campaign.

Do you think other airlines will develop a dementia-friendly policy?

We are the first airline to join the Dementia Friends program. This is a challenge that concerns the whole industry and we have no doubt that other airlines will follow suit.

For more, go to: http://www.easyjet.com/en/