Christmas can be an isolating time for people with dementia

Christmas can be an isolating time for people with dementia

This article comes to us from Unforgettable.org. Check them out for plenty of tips, ideas, and interesting articles related to memory and dementia:

For those living with dementia it is easy to be forgotten.

For the family and professional carers it can seem overwhelming and hopeless.

Unforgettable can help on every step of the journey with practical advice, specialised products and a supportive community.

Christmas can be an isolating time for people with dementia

The Alzheimer’s Society has discovered over half of people with dementia see their family less often during Christmas than they did before they were diagnosed

The song may claim ‘it’s the most wonderful time of the year’, but for many people with Alzheimer’s disease or other types of dementia, it can become the opposite, as Christmas can be very isolating.

That’s what a recent report from the Alzheimer’s Society is hoping to highlight.

They’ve carried out research which has found over half of people affected by dementia find Christmas the most isolating time of the year, with many saying that they actually dread the festive season. Just over half (54%) say the see their friends and family less often over the Christmas period than they did before their diagnosis.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Reminiscence TV: Our 12 picks of Christmas

Reminiscence TV: Our 12 picks of Christmas

 Looking for some familiar classics this holiday season? This article comes to us from Unforgettable.org. Check them out for plenty of tips, ideas, and interesting articles related to memory and dementia:

For those living with dementia it is easy to be forgotten.

For the family and professional carers it can seem overwhelming and hopeless.

Unforgettable can help on every step of the journey with practical advice, specialised products and a supportive community.

 

Reminiscence TV: Our 12 picks of Christmas

Settling down on the sofa to watch a TV show is as much a part of the festive season as turkey and mince pies. Here’s our selection of the best shows airing this Christmas that will trigger memories and special moments for someone with dementia

Television can play a useful role at Christmas when you’re caring for someone with dementia. The right shows at the right time can help loved ones to relax, and may even stir good memories and great conversation. But with so many channels and programmes to choose from, simply selecting something what they (and you) might enjoy could take quite some time…So we’ve done the leg work for you! Here’s 12 dementia-friendly dramas, comedies and films which will be screened over Christmas.

Continue reading

8 questions if a loved one is visiting from a care home this Christmas

 

8 questions if a loved one is visiting from a care home this Christmas

 This article comes to us from Unforgettable.org. Check them out for plenty of tips, ideas, and interesting articles related to memory and dementia:

For those living with dementia it is easy to be forgotten.

For the family and professional carers it can seem overwhelming and hopeless.

Unforgettable can help on every step of the journey with practical advice, specialised products and a supportive community.

8 questions if a loved one is visiting from a care home this Christmas

If your loved one with dementia lives in a care home you might be wondering whether to bring them home for Christmas, and whether that’s even the best thing for them. Here’s eight questions to ask yourself before making a decision.

You may hate the idea of the person you love spending Christmas in a care home, but although emotions might be running high, it’s important to think carefully and calmly and weigh up all the pros and cons before deciding what to do.

1. How long have they been in the care home and how settled are they?

If your loved one has been in residential care for some time and seems quite content, they may really enjoy a day out, or even an overnight stay. However, if they always seem restless when you visit – perhaps they keep packing their bags or asking ‘when are we going home?’ – taking them out may seem like the ‘right’ thing to do…but may result in them becoming angry and aggressive when they return. If you’re still adamant they should come home with you, then any upsetting behaviour when they return may be a price worth paying… or maybe not.

2. How well do outings generally go?

Be honest: Even if it’s stressful for you, does the person you love seem to enjoy getting out…

Continue reading

Make Christmas Day special for a loved one with dementia

Make Christmas Day special for a loved one with dementia

 This article comes to us from Unforgettable.org. Check them out for plenty of tips, ideas, and interesting articles related to memory and dementia:

For those living with dementia it is easy to be forgotten.

For the family and professional carers it can seem overwhelming and hopeless.

Unforgettable can help on every step of the journey with practical advice, specialised products and a supportive community.

 

Make Christmas Day special for a loved one with dementia

 

Are you worried that the person you care for will find it difficult to cope on Christmas Day? Find out how to make the big day enjoyable for the whole family.

Whether you’ve got a houseful of guests on Christmas Day, are invited out for lunch, or are celebrating quietly in your own home, here’s how to overcome all the potential pitfalls and ensure events go as smoothly as possible if you have someone with dementia staying with you.

1. Opening presents

It doesn’t matter how old you are, everyone enjoys receiving presents. A person with dementia might not remember what the occasion is, but if you hand them a present with a smile and say ‘Merry Christmas’ they’ll soon get the idea.

Give them time to open it without feeling rushed. Offer help if they need it but don’t try to rush them. If they don’t want to open it yet, that’s fine too. Leave it until later. A person with dementia can become stressed if they feel everyone’s watching them, so keep present-giving calm and casual.

Try not to take it personally if they don’t seem grateful or don’t react in the way they normally would to a generous or thoughtful gift. Remember, they’re doing the best they can and they still love you as much as they always have.

Watch out for tripping hazards. Presents and wrapping paper scattered all over the floor can be dangerous for a person who’s frail and prone to stumbling. Have a recycling bag ready to clear up wrapping paper and make sure gifts are put somewhere safe

Continue reading

The 12 rules of Christmas dementia care

The 12 rules of Christmas dementia care

 This post comes to us from Unforgettable.org. Check them out for plenty of tips, ideas, and interesting articles related to memory and dementia:

For those living with dementia it is easy to be forgotten.

For the family and professional carers it can seem overwhelming and hopeless.

Unforgettable can help on every step of the journey with practical advice, specialised products and a supportive community.

If a loved one has dementia you might be worried about how they’ll cope during the festive season. Read our simple guide to help you make Christmas as enjoyable as possible – for everyone.

1. Have a plan

Taking a, ‘let’s see what happens’ approach to the festive season isn’t going to work when you’re caring for someone with dementia. Spontaneous visits can be stressful so make sure to contact anyone who usually drops by (and who your loved one will definitely want to see) and organise dates and times in advance.

2. Trust your instinct

It’s not too late to change a plan you may have agreed to initially but which you’re now worried about. For example, if you’re dreading an overnight stay with Aunty Alice because you know your loved one won’t sleep and could become very unsettled, trust your instinct, confront it now and either cancel the trip or agree to a shorter visit which can be done in a day.

Continue reading

Nu starter byggeriet af demensvenlig bydel

Byen for Livet kommer til at ligge centralt i Odense. I den nye bydel skal man kunne bo og leve livet – hele livet – også hvis man bliver afhængig af pleje for eksempel som følge af demens.

Plejeboliger og demensvenlighed bliver helt integreret i bydelen, så man kan fortsætte sit liv i vante rammer, hvis man bliver syg. Det betyder blandt andet, at man kan blive boende sammen med eller i umiddelbar nærhed af sin ægtefælle eller partner, også selvom man måtte få brug for intensiv pleje.

Bydelen kommer til at rumme et helt særligt plejehjem, hvor beboerne bor og lever i mindre enheder i overensstemmelse med den livsstil, de foretrækker. Livsstil bliver defineret som kultur i bred forstand, så det kommer til at handle om meget mere end boligindretning. For eksempel den mad man foretrækker, den musik man kan lide, foretrukne aktiviteter og den måde man er sammen på.

Source: Byen for Livet: Nu starter byggeriet af demensvenlig bydel – Magasinet Pleje

Visiting babies in Danish care homes

Now the Copenhagen care home residents begin to rejoice. The City of Copenhagen follows the lead of the city of Aarhus and introduces the successful “visit baby scheme” in care homes. 

Read the full article (in Danish) here:  Visiting Babies introduced in Copenhagen care homes

Scheme for baby visits to the care home in Aarhus has emerged as a ‘resounding success’

Babyglæde. Ældre Sagen mener, at ordning med besøgsbabyer er »en rigtig god idé«. Aarhus Kommune indførte ordningen for et år siden, og nu kommer Københavns Kommune efter. Ældre Sagen ser gerne, at endnu flere kommuner følger trop. - Foto: Miriam Dalsgaard (arkiv)

Baby Joy! DaneAge believes that the system of visiting babies is “a great idea.” Aarhus Municipality introduced the system a year ago, and now more municipalities will follow suit. Photo Miriam Dalsgaard

There is just something that happens when a baby visits the care home. It creates joy that parents come by with a little optimistic miracle that the elderly may be allowed to hold and interact with.

This is what has happened in Aarhus, and why the municipality started introducing the initiative in all of their care homes a year ago. Aarhus calls the initiative ‘visiting babies’. And the system has emerged as something of a success.

Now follow the City of Copenhagen follows.

 

 

Dementia frontrunner Japan destigmatises condition, stresses community care

Dementia frontrunner Japan destigmatises condition, stresses community care

When Masahiko Sato was diagnosed at age 51 with early-onset Alzheimer’s, he felt his life was over. A decade later, Sato has a mission: destigmatising a condition with a growing social impact in a country that leads the global aging trend.

“Whether people with dementia can ‘come out’ depends on the values and culture of the community,” said Kumiko Nagata, research director at the Dementia Care Research and Training Centre, Tokyo, adding that attitudes were changing.

Read the whole article and watch the video at:  http://uk.reuters.com/article/us-japan-dementia-widerimage-idUKKCN0XB2WS

Meet the Internet’s most powerful warrior against ageism: Baddie Winkle.

Read more (and see the awesome pictures!!) at:  http://www.upworthy.com/meet-the-internets-most-powerful-warrior-against-ageism-baddie-winkle?c=reccon3

You can also see more pictures and follow her on

Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/baddiewinkle/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/baddiewinkle

 

Professor Uses Spice Painting to Slow Progress of Dementia

Dr. Tisone’s scent painting activity involves mixing spices with water to make watercolor paints with the hope that the scents will bring back memories for the patients.  Students are trained to elicit conversation based on reactions to those smells.

– See more at: Professor Uses Spice Painting to Slow Progress of Dementia

Coopersmith’s One-of-a-Kind Tours donates to Cure Alzheimer’s Fund

Coopersmith’s One-of-a-Kind Tours

Paul Coopersmith has been running Coopersmith’s One-of-a-Kind Tours in the UK, Western Europe, Japan and New Zealand since 1984. His tours are targeted towards travelers who don’t consider themselves the typical “tour types” – they consist of small groups and cover limited geographical areas in order to spend ample time in each location, focusing on gardens, stately homes and fine arts.

This year, Paul decided to use his popular tours to make a difference in Alzheimer’s research.

For each person who signs up for the Springtime in the Cotswolds tour for 2016, Coopersmith’s will donate $500 to Cure Alzheimer’s Fund. Learn more on their website, coopersmiths.com.

See more at: http://curealz.org/heroes/paul-coopersmith#sthash.fOtSPMX4.dpuf

 

Patients Like Me

Have you heard about PatientsLikeMe? It is a global connection platform based out of the US. Here, people can share their experiences and information on their treatments, how well they do or don’t work, information on doctors or treatment centers and so much more. It’s also a great way to get support and to support others. We have a lot we can learn from each other!

In fact, researchers have even started to use PatientsLikeMe to find information on adverse drug reactions, dosages, side effects of conditions and of treatments, and much more about what it is like to live with a specific condition. Check out their website, read about specific conditions or treatments, or join and start sharing your experiences and learning from others going through similar situations.

PatientsLikeMe